Low in Iron? Here’s Something You Should Know…

July 21, 2021

Written by

Lucas Aoun

Founder @ Ergogenic Health

If you’ve struggled with low iron levels in the past, you may want to avoid using these around iron rich foods/supplements…

 

Don’t combine red meat with the following…

 

Milk Thistle.

 

Milk thistle contains silybin, which is a potential iron chelator (Hutchinson et al., 2018).

 

Coffee with meals.

 

Polyphenols present in coffee inhibit iron absorption during a meal in a dose-dependent manner (Layrisse et al, 2000).

 

Aspiring.

 

Aspirin has iron-chelating properties, and thus, when combined with iron rich foods, may reduce iron absorption (Schwartz et al., 1988).

 

Zinc Supplements.

 

Use of a modest zinc supplement improves zinc indices, but also appears to induce a cellular iron deficiency and, possibly, further reduce iron status (Donangelo et al., 2002).

 

Turmeric/Curcumin.

 

Consistent with the hypothesis that curcumin acts as an iron chelator, mice that were fed diets supplemented with curcumin exhibited a decline in levels of ferritin protein in the liver (Jiao et al., 2006).

 

Chili.

 

One study demonstrated that freeze-dried, ground chili pepper (14.2 g fresh wt; 25 mg polyphenols as gallic acid equivalents) reduced iron absorption from a basic rice and vegetable meal by 38% (P=0.0017)(Tuntipopipat et al., 2006).

 

Black Tea with meals.

 

Black tea is known to be a potent inhibitor of intestinal absorption of non-haem iron at least in healthy subjects (Kaltwasseret et al., 1998).

 

Cranberry supplements.

 

The strong iron-binding properties of the predicted “iron-binding motif” in phenolic compounds present in cranberries and other plants have been confirmed (Guoa et al., 2007).

 

Calcium supplements.

 

Pre-menopausal women with low iron stores show significant inhibition of non-haem iron absorption with co-consumption of a typical calcium supplement (Benkhedda et al., 2009).

 

On the contrary, if you have high iron retention, these can be useful.

 

Always get your levels checked via blood test!


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