Your Blood Tests are Normal, but You Don’t Feel Like It? Here’s why…

May 25, 2021

Written by

Lucas Aoun

Founder @ Ergogenic Health

This problem can occur to many.

 

Your doctor may come back and say, “Your results are normal”, yet you feel completely opposite.

 

Why this is happening…

 

This is a perfect example.

 

There is a blood test called Thyroid Stimulating Hormone (TSH) test.

 

This is often the first test doctors order to assess thyroid function.

 

However, the reference range is between 0.4-4 mIU/L.

 

You could be right in the middle of this reference range and your doctor may say “your results are perfect”.

 

But this is not a direct measure of your actual thyroid hormones/metabolic rate.

 

Here’s what to do.

 

Are you average?

 

Because your blood tests are based on the average of millions of others in your country.

 

Would you say that the average person is healthy, high energy, and thriving? I highly doubt it.

 

In result, you get average – “normal” results, and your health isn’t ideal.

 

To solve the problem, you need go deeper.

 

Assessing T4, T3 & Reverse T3 will give you an accurate reading of your metabolic rate/thyroid function.

 

For example, your TSH may read as 2.5 but then you have low T3 and normal T4.

 

This can easily explain your fatigue, depression, and constipation.

 

You’re weak in one area, but strong in another one. In result, your results show the average TSH, and it says “normal”.

 

Remember this.

 

Do not rely on TSH to assess your thyroid hormone/metabolic rate.

 

It is essential to assess T4, T3 & Reverse T3.

 

If you are struggling with energy, fatigue and low motivation, challenge the status quo and demand to know more.

 

I will be releasing more blood testing assessment hacks in my newsletter and on my social media.

 

Click here to subscribe to my newsletter.

  

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